Disabled Young Adult Children
Disabled Young Adult Children
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An Adult Disabled Child May Qualify for SSDI

Young adults who have a disabling condition may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits (SSDI) through their parents’ work history. The applicant can be any age (even in their 30s or 40s) as long as they became disabled before they turned 22.

SSDI claims for adult disabled children are complex. At Spector and Lenz, PC, in Chicago, our team will do everything we can to help you or your son or daughter qualify for benefits. Attorney Deborah Spector brings 40 years of focused experience in disability law.

Eligibility for an Adult Child to Claim Disability

Social Security Disability (SSDI) is a safety net for people who have paid into Social Security through their paychecks. A young adult who has never worked, or did not work enough before becoming disabled, will not qualify for SSDI under his or her own earnings.

However, an adult child may qualify for SSDI under a parent or stepparent who is currently receiving Social Security benefits, or under a deceased parent who paid into the system, if the child:

  • Is 18 or older and unmarried
  • Has a qualifying physical or mental impairment as defined by the Social Security Administration
  • Became disabled before the age of 22
  • Receives no substantial income from working (maximum of $1,260 per month (for 2020))

The amount of SSDI is based on the parent’s earnings history. If granted, benefits are retroactive up to five months prior to the date of application.

What About Disability After Age 22?

A person who becomes disabled after turning 22 cannot qualify for SSDI under a parent’s Social Security record but may qualify under his or her own earnings, depending on age and work history. SSA makes allowances for young adults (up to age 31) who have had fewer years in the workforce to accumulate work credits. We can help you determine if you qualify.

Adult children who are not eligible for Social Security Disability may be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if they have minimal earnings and assets. We handle both SSDI and SSI claims.

We Can Help. Disability Law Is All We Do.

The lawyers of Spector and Lenz are knowledgeable about disabling conditions that commonly affect young adults, from spinal disorders, Crohn’s disease, and other physical impairments to autism/Asperger’s, schizophrenia, depression, and other mental disorders. The subjective nature of the symptoms can make these claims hard to prove.

Our knowledge of the medical criteria and thorough understanding of the Social Security system give clients the tools they need to get approved for benefits.

Call our Chicago law firm at 312-815-5231 or contact us online to arrange a free initial consultation. There are no attorney fees unless we secure SSDI or SSI benefits. Se habla español.